Lyme arthritis symptoms in young child emerge years after tick bite

lyme-arthritis-children
Symptoms of Lyme disease may not present immediately following a tick bite. As this case report highlights, taking a thorough medical and travel history can be crucial in diagnosing and treating the illness.

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Why are doctors reluctant to treat Lyme disease?

Doctor treating lyme disease in female patient.
It can be extremely challenging for patients to locate a physician who is trained in treating Lyme disease or even, willing to treat the illness. So, why all the reluctance by clinicians?

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Are Lyme disease patients at greater risk for developing severe COVID-19?

Woman with Lyme disease and COVID-19 being examined in hospital bed.
Cancer, chronic kidney diseases, diabetes mellitus, and hypertension have been associated with severe COVID-19, wrote Ng and colleagues in the journal mBio. [1] Could Lyme disease increase the risk of severe COVID-19?

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Prolonged Babesia infection in patient with asplenia

Elderly man with Babesia infection getting blood pressure tested.
Babesia is an increasingly common tick-borne illness which can be transmitted by the black-legged tick, the same type of tick that carries Lyme disease, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasmosis. Individuals infected with the Babesia parasite can be asymptomatic or may present with malaise, fatigue, fever, headache, chills, sweats, weight loss, and myalgia. The risk of a prolonged infection is increased in patients after splenectomy, as this study highlights.

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How does Lyme disease affect the brain?

Physicians reviewing MRI to review how does Lyme disease affect the brain.
Lyme disease can lead to acute and chronic disturbances of the brain including encephalopathy, meningitis, neuropsychiatric disease, central sensitization syndrome, visual disturbances, and Bell's palsy (paralysis of the facial muscles). In a recent study, researchers described what Lyme disease can do to your brain.

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Illinois clinicians demonstrate gaps in understanding of tick-borne co-infections

Clinician talking about co-infections with patient.
A tick bite can lead to an individual contracting Lyme disease and/or another tick-borne illness. Results from a recent survey of clinicians practicing in Illinois found gaps in understanding of Lyme disease and co-infections.

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Powassan virus encephalitis contracted during winter months

Man with powassan virus encephalitis holding his head.
Most individuals with Powassan virus are asymptomatic but the virus can cause serious complications, penetrating the central nervous system and causing severe encephalitis or meningitis. Investigators explore the case of a 62-year-old man who contracted the virus through a tick bite he received during the winter months, outside normal tick season.

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3 benefits of telemedicine for Lyme disease

Patient on telemedicine visit during COVID pandemic.
It can be difficult finding a doctor to recognize and treat Lyme disease. Now with telemedicine, you may be able to consult with a Lyme doctor, who specializes in tick-borne diseases. In a recent study, Trevisan and colleagues describe 3 benefits that telemedicine has had on treating Lyme disease patients.

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Can Lyme disease be mistaken for herpes?

Photo of Lyme disease rash that appears to be herpes lesions.
Only 1 in 4 Lyme disease rashes present in a Bull’s-eye pattern. In fact, lesions can appear as a flat red rash, a blistering rash, and a rash that resembles cellulitis. Investigators describe a woman with Lyme disease who presented with a rare variant of an erythema migrans (EM) rash, which appeared with a herpetiform center.

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Could Lyme disease have led to a spinal cord lesion?

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Doctors considered Lyme disease as a possible cause of a longitudinally extensive spinal cord lesion in a 55-year-old man. The clinicians considered a spinal cord infarction, a malignancy and Lyme disease.

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