Babesia and Lyme — it’s worse than you think

Babesia and Lyme — it’s worse than you think

Babesia, a tick-borne infection that causes malaria-like symptoms, has been making headlines over the past two years as the number of reported cases increases, and concerns grow over the seriousness of the disease and its ability to be transmitted through the blood supply.

 

by Daniel J. Cameron, MD, MPH

Although Lyme disease is the most talked about tick-transmitted disease, Babesia is more common than you might think. In the 2015 issue of Trends in Parasitology, Diuk-Wasser and colleagues report that up to 40% of patients with Lyme disease experienced concurrent Babesiosis. [1]

This means that out of the estimated 300,000 cases of Lyme disease reported annually in the U.S., 120,000 of those individuals may also have Babesia. This is particularly alarming given that the disease can go undetected in asymptomatic individuals and is transmissible through blood transfusions or congenitally. Additionally, Babesia requires different treatment than Lyme disease.

The Babesia microti (B. microti) parasite that leads to Babesia is commonly seen in blacklegged deer ticks. But according to the authors, it’s also common to find ticks and enzootic hosts carrying both Borrelia burgdorferi (the causative agent of Lyme disease) and B. microti. In fact, between 12% and 42% of rodents are co-infected with both agents. This would suggest that “coinfection provides a survival advantage for both pathogens.” [1]

reported_cases_by_year_2013

Source: CDC. Number of Babesiosis cases since it become a nationally reportable disease in 2011.

The first case of Babesiosis caused by the B. microti parasite was identified in 1969 in an individual who had vacationed in Massachusetts. It wasn’t until 2011, that it became a nationally notifiable disease with more than 1100 cases reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two years later, this number had risen to nearly 1800.

A commentary, published in July 2015, entitled Time to Become Familiar with Babesiosis?  highlights the concern among those in the medical community. The article points out, “Babesiosis is the single most common transfusion-related infection.”

Setty and colleagues summarized their concern in a 2003 review, “Parasitemia in humans is transient and episodic. For this reason, there is a risk of asymptomatic donors transmitting the disease to recipients.” The authors raised concerns that there were 20 cases of Babesiosis and a variant Babesia strain called WA1 by red blood cells and blood component transfusions by 2003.

Babesia can lead to serious illness. Patients have presented with atrial fibrillation, [2] noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, [3] and anemia. [2] In New York, between 1982 and 1991, 7 people with Babesia died, while another patient on Nantucket Island developed pancarditis and died. [4]

Babesia occurs in individuals without the risk factors of increased age, prior splenectomy, immunosuppression, prematurity, and liver disease. [2] In one study of 192 patients, the average age was 46 years for individuals with Babesia. [5] The ages ranged from 27 to 83 years in a New York case series. [6] Five of 192 patients were immunosuppressed, [5] while none of the four subjects in another study had a splenectomy. [2]

Babesia can increase the severity of Lyme disease. Coinfected patients were more likely to have experienced fatigue, headache, sweats, chills, anorexia, emotional lability, nausea, conjunctivitis, and splenomegaly more frequently than those with Lyme disease alone. [7] 

Babesia can also increase the duration of illness with Lyme disease. Babesia patients can remain symptomatic for years with constitutional, musculoskeletal, or neurological symptoms. One study found that 50% of coinfected patients were symptomatic for 3 months or longer, compared to only 4% of patients who had Lyme disease alone. [7] Meanwhile, one-third of patients with a history of both Babesia and Lyme disease remained symptomatic an average of 6 years. [2]

“The clinical pictures for 3 out of our 4 coinfected patients included a large number of symptoms, and 1 coinfected patient had persistent fatigue after treatment,” according to a study by Steere and colleagues. [8]

Babesia – difficult to diagnose 

Equally worrisome is the fact that the disease can be difficult to diagnose based on symptoms. Nearly all patients with Babesia reported sweats. However, if the patient was coinfected with Lyme disease, the incidence of sweats dropped to 42%. Sweats can also be reported in other tick borne illnesses. [5]

Blood sample for babesia parasite testingBabesia can also be difficult to diagnose with current testing. The parasite was detected microscopically in as few as one-third of patients with Babesia. [5] Specific amplifiable DNA and IgM antibody were more likely to be positive. [5] The reliability of tests for Babesia in actual practice remains to be determined.

The Babesia tests can become negative. The Babesia sporozoites can be too few in number to be detected on a thin smear or can resolve with or without treatment. It’s been reported that a positive serologic test for B. microti will decay over time, leading to a negative test. Half of the patients with positive serologic tests for B. microti were negative on follow-up. [2]

Treating Babesia  

Babesia cannot be treated with the same medications used to treat Lyme disease. Doxycycline is effective for Lyme disease, Ehrlichia, and Anaplasmosis but not for Babesia.   Treatment with Mepron and Zithromax has been effective for Babesia. Quinine and clindamycin have also been effective but are associated with a higher rate of side effects. Flagyl and Tindamax drugs have been proposed but not well studied. The optimal treatment for Babesia has yet to be worked out.

Physicians have different views over the diagnosis and treatment of Babesia. The Infectious Diseases Society of America’s (IDSA) guidelines advise:

  1. Symptomatic patients whose serum contains antibody to Babesia but whose blood lacks identifiable Babesia parasites on smear or Babesia DNA by PCR should not receive treatment.
  2. Treatment is also not recommended for asymptomatic individuals, regardless of the results of serologic examination, blood smears, or PCR.
  3. Asymptomatic patients with positive Babesial smears and/or PCR should have these studies repeated, and a course of treatment should be considered if Parasitemia persists for >3 months. [9]

There are physicians who have elected not to treat Babesia patients, who are asymptomatic. In 1998, Krause and colleagues reported, “24 of 46 Babesia-infected subjects, who received no specific treatment, had Babesia DNA detectable in their blood for an average of 82 days.” [10]

In 2002, Krause et al reported, “Because symptoms had resolved or improved by the time concurrent Babesiosis or HGE was diagnosed, therapy was not administered to 38 (58%) of the patients with Lyme disease plus Babesiosis.” [5]

There are physicians concerned that symptoms of Babesia may be overlooked when evaluating patients. [11] The symptoms of chronic Lyme disease were overlooked for up to 14 years until reported in the 1990 New England Journal of Medicine by Logigian et al. [12] Meanwhile, the symptoms of Lyme disease were dismissed in by the IDSA Lyme disease guideline committee in 2000 and 2006 as nothing more than the aches and pains of daily living. [11] And the severity of the chronic manifestations were not validated until the 4 National Institutes of Health (NIH) sponsored clinical trials were completed. [13]

 

Sources:

  1. Diuk-Wasser MA, Vannier E, Krause PJ. Coinfection by Ixodes Tick-Borne Pathogens: Ecological, Epidemiological, and Clinical Consequences. Trends Parasitol, (2015).
  2. Wang TJ, Liang MH, Sangha O et al. Coexposure to Borrelia burgdorferi and Babesia microti does not worsen the long-term outcome of lyme disease. Clin Infect Dis, 31(5), 1149-1154 (2000).
  3. Golightly LM, Hirschhorn LR, Weller PF. Fever and headache in a splenectomized woman. Rev Infect Dis, 11(4), 629-637 (1989).
  4. Marcus LC, Steere AC, Duray PH, Anderson AE, Mahoney EB. Fatal pancarditis in a patient with coexistent Lyme disease and babesiosis. Demonstration of spirochetes in the myocardium. Ann Intern Med, 103(3), 374-376 (1985).
  5. Krause PJ, McKay K, Thompson CA et al. Disease-specific diagnosis of coinfecting tickborne zoonoses: babesiosis, human granulocytic ehrlichiosis, and Lyme disease. Clin Infect Dis, 34(9), 1184-1191 (2002).
  6. Meldrum SC, Birkhead GS, White DJ, Benach JL, Morse DL. Human babesiosis in New York State: an epidemiological description of 136 cases. Clin Infect Dis, 15(6), 1019-1023 (1992).
  7. Krause PJ, Feder HM, Jr. Lyme disease and babesiosis. Adv Pediatr Infect Dis, 9, 183-209 (1994).
  8. Steere AC, McHugh G, Suarez C, Hoitt J, Damle N, Sikand VK. Prospective study of coinfection in patients with erythema migrans. Clin Infect Dis, 36(8), 1078-1081 (2003).
  9. Wormser GP, Dattwyler RJ, Shapiro ED et al. The clinical assessment, treatment, and prevention of lyme disease, human granulocytic anaplasmosis, and babesiosis: clinical practice guidelines by the Infectious Diseases Society of America. Clin Infect Dis, 43(9), 1089-1134 (2006).
  10. Krause PJ, Spielman A, Telford SR, 3rd et al. Persistent parasitemia after acute babesiosis. N Engl J Med, 339(3), 160-165 (1998).
  11. Cameron DJ, Johnson LB, Maloney EL. Evidence assessments and guideline recommendations in Lyme disease: the clinical management of known tick bites, erythema migrans rashes and persistent disease. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther, 1-33 (2014).
  12. Logigian EL, Kaplan RF, Steere AC. Chronic neurologic manifestations of Lyme disease. N Engl J Med, 323(21), 1438-1444 (1990).
  13. Cameron DJ. Clinical trials validate the severity of persistent Lyme disease symptoms. Med Hypotheses, 72, 153-156 (2008).


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Robert
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Robert

I tested positive for B. microti IFA – IgG with a score of 160 from a IGeneX test but Lyme was negative. My symptoms are shortness of breath, light headedness when exercising, greatly decreased performance exercising, intermittent low oxygen saturation levels while exercising. Had a complete and extensive cardio and pulmonary workup with no issues found. I also have intermittent bouts of extreme fatigue, My doctor recommends 3 months of Zithro/Mepron. Is that one test and these symptoms enough to reach a diagnosis?

SM Lawton
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SM Lawton

Are non-epileptic seizures that last hours consistent with the symptoms of B. duncani? We are based on the West Coast.

Glenn T Andreiev
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Glenn T Andreiev

Hello Dr. Cameron. I got Babesiosis in 2017 on Long Island- experienced fatigue. appetite and taste loss, the start of liver shut down, hallucinations. I was in the hospital three days, but fully recovered. I was back working in two weeks. I know I dodged a bullet- but am starting a short documentary on the subject of tick diseases like Babesiosis. I enjoyed your well researched article.

Joel
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Joel

I have a IgG of 1:256 for B. Duncani WA1, does that mean I have babesia? I live in N.Y.

I have had terrible joint pain and also body jerking and twitching for a few months.

Leila
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Leila

Hi Dr. Cameron, I just received a “past infection” result with Babesia antibody IGG of 1:64 with no positive results for Lyme. Sounds crazy but I am happy. For the last 2 years I have suffered with what my neurologist and GP believe is atypical trigeminal nueralgia and occipital nueralgia of my right side. On anti-seizure meds for the nerve pain but don’t really help much. I have had extreme facial and head pain, bouts of extreme vertigo, pain in my neck, head and shoulder, achy right side of my body and fatigue (I need sleep!) Could this “past infection”… Read more »

Jeff
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Jeff

Is there any substitute for clindamycin in quinine treatment as I am a high candidate for cdiff

kristine wineland
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kristine wineland

Treated 9 mo ago properly for lyme and babesiosis. Sx free until 2 wks ago. Now having exertional sob, night sweats, chest pain in midline (like I can’t fully inhale) intermittent abdominal pain, anorexia. 65 y/o in good health. Should I get a CBC or other bloodwork?

Kevin
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Kevin

Thank you Dr. Cameron for your time. I have Bartonella (from a cat scratch in 2010), then a tick bite with classic lyme in 2013. I couldn’t sit for more than 20 min without walking around or lying on the floor from extreme low back/sacro-illiac pain. I improved SIGNIFICANTLY on levaquin in 2015 (not via llmd, but my general practitioner as a trial to see if I had bart as IM rocephin didn’t do anything), then stopped all antibiotics for 2 years only to relapse since I didn’t have an llmd yet. I have been treating with an LLMD for… Read more »

Paul
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Paul

Hello, I removed a tick from my nine-year-old son, 11 days ago. CAES in CT test reported “partially engorged” (min. 48 hours attached) and positive for both lyme and babesia. Do any physicians recommend treating for either of these potential infections based upon this evidence alone? To date, he is asymptomatic, but my wife and I feel it might be prudent to treat before a bacteria or parasite has time to incubate/proliferate. What are your thoughts? Thank you.

Susan
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Susan

Patient #1 – My ex-husband has been treated for Lyme since last summer. He’s been on antibiotics since then (two). He feels better but began suffering from neurological issues effecting his speech (sounds like he’s had a stroke), swallowing, and now breathing. His doctor, whose whole practice is Lyme patients, (we are in northern Vermont) is now trying to rule out ALS but things aren’t looking good, no matter what the cause is. He drools in his sleep, bites his cheek and tongue when he eats, can’t laugh (or cry) normally, can’t whistle, gets short of breath with minimal activity.… Read more »

Elise
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Elise

Hello Dr. My husband was diagnosed with Lyme disease and Babesia in January after being sick for nearly 9 months. He was on a 4 month regimen of cefuroxime and azithromycin plus atovoquone and now he’s just switched to doxy and cefdinir. Although he still has bad days we’ve been discussing the idea of getting pregnant with our second child. Can you give advice as to whether his diagnosis or treatment may negatively affect a developing fetus? Could there be behave genetic implications?Should we wait until treatment has completed? I’m in my late 30s so I hesitate to wait too… Read more »

Janelle
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Janelle

Thank you! I’ve had Negative Elisa, PCR and western blot. All by conventional medicine. I’ve been sick for 6 years. Could there still be Lyme or co infection possibility?

Janelle
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Janelle

Hello! Can you have Babesia or bartonella without actually having Lyme?

Courtney
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Courtney

Hi Dr. Cameron, thank you for providing your valuable knowledge to those of us who are in need. You are amazing! I’ve been treating Lyme and Babesia (as well as parasites, mold, and metals) naturally for 2+ years after an initial 4 months of antibiotics that made me feel worse. I think I’m very slowly gaining some ground but I’m worried that I’m heading into the dreaded autoimmune response / stage 3. My Naturopath recently prescribed 14 days of Mepron. I’m wondering if this alone (ie without the Azithromycin) is enough to help or am I wasting my money (at… Read more »

Jerry
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Jerry

Dr. Cameron I am impressed that you have been answering these posts for years. I was diagnosed with babesia and lyme in 2015. I did spend a week in the hospital and was interviewed by the CDC and answered many questions while being hospitalized. I was quite ill for a few weeks, was told I had an enlarged liver, went through a spinal tap procedure and plasma transfusion but seemed to recover fully after 4-5 months. Why do I keep reading of people suffering from tick borne diseases for years yet mine seemed to run a natural course? Are there… Read more »

Noah Kratzer
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Noah Kratzer

Dr. Cameron, in your experience does babesia ever cause a tingling or burning sensation in the feet? I’ve been treated for bartonella and Lyme in the past, although my doctor doesn’t believe babesia is one of my problems. I’ve made some improvements in the past year but I’m starting to wonder if babesia could be the cause of my lingering daily headaches (feel like a pressure around the head) and tingling of the feet (usually occurs after activity). I also have been finding small bruises on my legs that come and go without any seeming cause. Could it be worthwhile… Read more »

Debra Anderson
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Debra Anderson

Dr. Cameron, you share that you prefer Malerone to Mepron these days in the treatment of Babesia… Just wondering if you usually include Azith. along with the Malerone. I’ve read both, that it’s only necessary to use with Mepron, and not with Malerone. Your thoughts — with or without? Thank you.

R.B. Thescot
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R.B. Thescot

I have read that Babesia can persist in the miles of tubules in teeth. I’m asymptomatic. What risk is there of Babesia (or Lyme, Bartonella) re-emerging after dental work, cleanings, oral surgery, periodontal procedures. And is there a benefit to involving the dentist and opening up the can of worms unnecessarily?

eric m youngman
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Thank you for all your info. Its takes a special person to spend time to answer questions. My question is simple.. i was tested for bartonella it shows a low reading, but not high enough to be postive. Can you still have bartonella. this test was taken 1.5 months later after being diagnosed with lyme. I had 5 out of 10 bands and 3 out of 5 bands. it started with a rash, headaches, pain up and down my back and stomach area then bells palsey, After 3 weeks of treatment all pain went away.. however. I get humming in… Read more »

Jon
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Jon

De Cameron thank you for this insightful content – you are helping so many people with this information.

I’ve been struggling with fatigue, headaches and brain fog for the past 4 years and have seen over 12 specialists – only today did I test positive for babesia fish and duncani IgM.

What kind of doctor should I see to treat this?

Will I get better? Or are chances of the medication working slim?

Thank you

Jane
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Jane

Good to see someone finally mentioned B. duncani, which is becoming more widespread and can be even nastier than B. microti. Perhaps the former deserves some specific commentary from you, Dr. Cameron.

LindaWAS
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LindaWAS

Hi Dr. Cameron, my 16 year old daughter is being treated for babesia with a protocol of malarone and zithromax. After 1 month, her LLMD wants to add Coartem to the malarone (and ditch the zithromax). All the Coartem protocols I have seen are several days on, then time off; her LLMD wants to use malarone and Coartem every day together. What are your thoughts on this approach? Thanks for your answer and for your valuable website.

Beth
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Beth

It’s taken 16 years to find out what’s wrong with my 18 year old son. Full blown 10 years ago after 2 weeks of the flu. Doctors thought I was crazy and he was “functional “. I was beside my self because last year he started having tremors throughout his body and seizures. SPECT shows like an 80 year old dementia patient. Had a positive Babinski sign and Neuro did an MS work up. Now everyone is worried. After having an expert out in California look at his scan he recommended a dr because his brain looked like a virus… Read more »

Kristy
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Kristy

My son is 9 and started having tics in 2015 following a strep infection. We recently had him tested to see if his tics were caused by the strep and we also had him tested for lyme. His Elisa tests came back negative but his western blot was IgMAlt positive for Igm 41,34 and IgG 93/83,41. We also received blood work for babesia microti by IFA negative IgG positive IgM and anaplasama by IFA was negative IgG and IgM positive. Does those tests mean he has lyme,babesia and anaplasma? Also the dr wants to treat 2weeks doxy and 1 week… Read more »

Shareen
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My daughter..age 9… last year was covered in the tiny ticks and i took her straight to our pediatrician two days after when she developed large pink filled in circles.. we were sent home with nothing!! 6 weeks later she got very ill..neck,joint pain,lethargic,large r ash on back of leg,leg tremors.. sooo awful.. we went o C. Barnwell, from Georgia and did 9 months of cefdinir and azythromycin along with lots of natural herbs..etc.. we moved to the beaches of Florida to escape the HUGE amount of people that are getting tickborn illnesses in coweta and fayette counties..Georgia.. its been… Read more »

Susan Peters
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Susan Peters

Dear Dr. Cameron, First thanks so much for your valuable time helping patients with questions. I have had Babesia Ducani for many years now. I have been treating with “Coartem ” the last 6 months, but NOW trying to trick the parasite and go back to Malorne. I Continue to show a “high load” of Babesia Ducani at Igenex Labs. I am now 71 years old……..and seriously considering “Red Blood Cell” Exchange Tranfusion due to my age. I know of ONE LLMD in Puerto Valarta, Mexico that does this and has excellent results with difficult treatment resistant cases of Babesia….especially… Read more »

fatih
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fatih

Hello,I have been suffering from kidney and liver damage after an unsafe sex.I couldn’t find the reason.Could it be babesia or other pathogens?

Amanda
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Amanda

My physician is suspecting Babesia. However, I do not have the lab results yet. I never saw a tick on me. I was on a 2 month course of Minocycline and Azithromycin. We did not continue that due to chest pressure. I had to go see a Cardiologist. All Cardio tests were negative. I had a brain MRI without contrast that a Neurologist states it shows periventricular gliosis. He is assuming MS but is unsure. I have night sweats, low grade fevers, insomnia, and I am very dizzy everyday. All autoimmune lab tests were negative. I do weight training and… Read more »

Courtney Baradel
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Courtney Baradel

I was just treated for Lyme for 4 months with Biaxin and Amoxicillin. I’m still not feeling well. My doctor thinks it’s Babesia and want me in Mepron. Will that antibiotic alone do the trick? I really don’t want to go in Biaxin again.

Melanie
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Melanie

Dr.Cameron
Test order: Lyme Ab/Westeren Blot Reflex
IgG P39Ab,P41Ab, P45Ab Present
IgM P23Ab, IgMP41Ab Present
Lyme IgG WB interp. NEgative
Lyme IgM WB interp. Positive
Lyme disease Ab, Quant, IgM. Equivocal 0.97
Lyme IgG/IgM Ab. Equivocal 0.91
QUESTION? DO I HAVE LYME?

Brad
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Brad

Thanks for this site Dr. Cameron. My 88 year-old Dad was just diagnosed yesterday with Babesia after going through a month of feeling awful – nausea, headaches, fatigue, loss of appetite, anemia, etc – I was concerned we might lose him. He’s been better the past week, so the Dr. who made the diagnosis – his former oncologist (Colon cancer in 1993) – didn’t prescribe anything. I wondering if that is the best approach or whether it might be wise to have a treatment of Mepron with Zithromax. Your thoughts?

Douglas Acker
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Douglas Acker

Dr Cameron, I am being treated for Babesia (Mepron / Zithromax). I started feeling better within ~9 hours of starting antibiotics. I also tested positive for Lyme. Initially I convinced my Dr to start the Babesia treatment before tests came back. All of the symptoms were a perfect fit including ultrasound of liver and spleen (enlarged). He agreed enough to prescribe the two drugs, but only 5 days initially. Now it is time to prescribe remaining treatment and he was prepared to only add 2 days. I explained most updated literature talks about individual clinical assessment to determine length of… Read more »

Colleen
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Colleen

My son and I were each bitten, him by an Ixodis larva or nymph, and me by an adult dog tick, 2 days ago, while vacationing in Long Island, NY. Far in country, we had no tweezers, and had to remove both ticks by hand, with some squeezing of tick bodies unavoidable. I think we got each out looking intact, in less than 24 hours, but worry that each tick body got squeezed during removal.
Dr. Cameron, my question is: how soon can we test for tick-borne pathogens, and which tests would be best? Thank you so much!

Tammy Sullivan
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Tammy Sullivan

Dr. Cameron:
I’ve asked this question to my pharmacists and others and can not seem to get a clear cut answer – Is it okay to use an infrared sauna while taking doxy?

Tammy Sullivan
Guest
Tammy Sullivan

Thank you for your quick response. Are you saying because I’ve been taking doxy, the knee fluid will be neg. even if active lyme? My doctor said I have old antibodies to babesia but not currently active – she did a lab order for Babesia Microti DNA, QUAL, PCR, Unspecified Specimen and Babesia Smear, Blood . I know results can be false/neg and feel confident I have it and need to be treated for it – do you take lyme patients? Where you you located in NY?

Tammy Sullivan
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Tammy Sullivan

Dr. Cameron Can Babesia be cured without treatment over time and a strong immune system? I recently tested positive to ALL bands on western blot. I believe I was infected in 2009 when I was violently ill with a “flu” that lasted several weeks and since then, I continue to get the same familiar achiness throughout my body and last summer was sick from June-Sept with “5ths disease”. In April of this year my knee became double in size which finally resulted in a lyme test ….. I am now on my ninth week of doxy with two doctors that… Read more »

Hilary
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Hilary

Hello Dr Cameron, I’ve been searching for years (close to a decade now)for a doctor that can help me in the Houston area. I’ve been told that I have fibromyalgia, but my symptoms are so much more and keep getting worse. After 20 years in dentistry, I had to stop because of severe pain and migraines. I started to suspect Lyme after my mom was diagnosed and those close to me said my symptoms matched. The deeper I researched, the more I realized I have/have had every symptom on rhe chronic Lyme list as well as other coinfections. The last… Read more »

Evan
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Evan

Back in January of this year, after multiple trips to urgent care and my pcp over the course of 4 weeks, I was finally diagnosed with Lyme and Babesiosis. I was treated with Doxy as well as Atovquone and Azithromycin for 10 days. Within 48 hours the majority of my symptoms had cleared up. Now, 6 months later, I am having the same symptoms, but they seem to be worse. It’s only been a week, but the headaches are crippling sometimes, and the fatigue is so bad I have a hard time making it through a day just sitting at… Read more »

Sandy
Guest
Sandy

I was diagnosed with Branch Retinal Artery Occlusions in April 2018 and Babesiosis about 6-weeks later. I have Hollenhorst Plaques in the Occlusions. I am 40 and do not have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, my echocardiogram and carotid doplar were good. I saw a hematologist and there has been no indication of a blood clotting disorder. I underwent a stroke assessment with an MRI/MRA and that was clear. I have severe fatigue, night sweats, chills, elevated temperature, excessive yawning after being up about 6hrs, and sometimes day sweats. My PCP prescribed the anitibiotic/antiparasitic that the CDC recommends. I am… Read more »

Katie
Guest
Katie

Sandy,
I had retinal occlusions as well. I have chromosomal disorders of the blood but not necessarily the cause. One evening, my right sideof my face was psrtially paralyzed and was experiencing numbness and tingling in my right arm and right leg. The er dr diagnosed Herpetic Neurolgia. I have not been able to work in an office. I am fatigued w sporadic high fevers/night sweats, headaches (right eye ) and joint pain. The clinical diagnosis is Bartonella in addition to thr lsbs that showed babesiosis (duncan) and Anaplasma. Try Bartonella?? Good luck.

Katie O
Guest
Katie O

Sandy, When I was 45, I was diagnosed with retinal vein occlusions. I, too have normal to low cholesterol, normal to low blood pressure- MRI/CAT scan- all negative. Went to Hematologist- had some chromosonal disorders of blood but none which should cause clotting issues. And, my same eye, was also very painful and times, lots of pressure , headaches right behind the eye. Three years later, hospitalized at Stamford Hospital for facial tingling, right side numbness, weakness. They ruled out a stroke and TIA. Ultimately, bc I kept insisting I could feel something in my ear as well, diagnosed w… Read more »

Richard
Guest
Richard

I have had Lyme several times over the past 20 years and had a doctor that specialized in the treatment of it. He has since retired from practice and my present Dr does not support long term treatment. I have tested positive/inconclusive for B. microti and cannot donate blood. My question is has there been any research on using colloidal silver? I used it with the antibiotics with the first Dr and told him and he said there was no reason to think it would not work as it was used to treat syphilis.

Nancy G.
Guest
Nancy G.

That’s interesting about kidney disease being associated with babesia. I didn’t know that. I have babesia, Lyme and bartonella. My kidney function test showed low filtration since at least 2015. GP’s and Internists don’t even mention it until their patients are critical and need dialysis, but my LLMD, who is a functional medicine doctor, was alarmed enough to suggest that I might need to see a kidney specialist. She also suggested I take Trizomal Gluthatione liquid, which can help heal kidneys. After a couple of months of that, my last kidney function test was normal, for the first time in… Read more »

Steve
Guest
Steve

Hello Dr. Cameron and fellow lyme peeps : ) No lyme disease for me as I can find from past ELISA and Western blot test but a recent blood work on me included a Babesia Microti Anti Panel test, and came back positive on the IgG @ 1:80. I suspect infection happened back in November 2013, but can not be sure. My Dr wrote me a prescription for 42 -100mg doxycycline capsules to be taken 2 times a day. But from the info here and elsewhere that is not the antibiotic that is normally used for babesia. When i questioned… Read more »

MT
Guest
MT

Last August I was sent a letter from the RI CDC that I was infected with B. Microti, recognized after a blood donation. I believe I was infected early summer. After convincing PCP to test , got tested in OCTober, smear neg. PCR was positive, serology not performed, and not given treatment. Pursued PCP due to symptoms, though not debilitating but present and affecting quality of life. Retested in Feb., smear was neg, PCR was neg, antibodies in sereology were 256. Granted treatment of Zpack and meprone. Felt good for a couple of weeks. Fatigue and joint pain resurfaced, more… Read more »

Elisa Masslich
Guest
Elisa Masslich

I used to go to you, Dr. Cameron, for treatment, but since I am very far and do not drive long distances and feel so very sick every day, I don’t know what to do. I tested positive for Lyme and Babesia microti, but recent tests from regular pc came back negative for both; I believe they used any old lab. I suffer with joint pain, night sweats, stiffness, constipation, heartburn, but MOST OF ALL SOMETHING I NEVER HEARD ANYONE MENTION, I HAVE CONSTANT BURNING LIKE A FIRE INSIDE MY ANAL AREA, 24/7, ALL DAY. gASTRO SAID IT MAY BE… Read more »

Gabriel Saks
Guest
Gabriel Saks

Hi Dr. Cameron. I found an adult deer tick on me (feeding near armpit) and removed it, and sent it to be tested at UMass “tickreport”. The tick tested positive for Babesia microti. It has been 10 days since I removed it, I am still asymptomatic (I have been feeling somewhat lethargic/depressed, and my arm on that side is slightly sore, but it may not be related). Should I get antibiotics just in case, since early treatment is more able to eradicate it?
Thank you very much!
Gabe

Guy Langellotti
Guest
Guy Langellotti

Good Morning Dr. Cameron… I came across this web page as a result of my search looking into repercussions for having Babesiosis… I was diagnosed with Babesiosis in July of 2016 (as well as Lyme, have had quite a few times) and had quite a bout with the Babesiosis. It’s a long story as to how I came to be tested though just the same, I definitely had it (or might I say still “have it”). I was blessed that my Emergency Room Doctor knew of the denial game that is going on and had my blood samples sent to… Read more »

Carolyn
Guest

I tested positive for Lyme back in 2007. Did 21 days of doxy and was fine. This past Oct I wasn’t feeling well…tested positive for Lyme but the doxy didn’t help this time. I went to a LLMD she has made taking zythromax and malorone along wth allergy meds. I have been feeling better with some bad days mixed in. I have read the symptoms on MS however and can not believe how similar they are to my symptoms. I feel like I haven’t had “classic” babesia symptoms. My worst symptom is I feel a shakey sensation in my head.… Read more »

Jillory
Guest
Jillory

I have had these symptoms for 25+ years. Lived in Oregon and Maine spending much time in the woods. Main symptoms, body pain, horrible sweats, vivid wild dreams, depression, restlessness, brain fog, tremor, unsteady balance, itching, increases heart rate and palpitations, chest pain, bladder instability anxiety, fatigue and more. Had to quit my nursing career because I could not deal with the stress. Was framed with diagnosis of Fibromyalgia. Last fall had 6 weeks of severe vertigo and doctor sent blood work to Stanford. Came back with Babesia lab value of 160. Have been put on all the top antibiotics… Read more »

Felip
Guest
Felip

I grew up in northern Westchester county, NY in a deer infested area and it took doctors almost 7 years to diagnose me with lyme disease. My problems go back to the early 90’s. I’ve heard of babesia and co-infections but never knew they could cause all these issues based on what folks in this thread are mentioning so that might be something for me to check out. The infectious disease doctor I saw in New York City sent me to have a SPECT scan of my brain since my big issues were panic attacks, phobias, stomach issues and intense… Read more »

Cindy
Guest
Cindy

Is a positive antibody test reason to treat symptoms?